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PIPELINE/POWER PLANT PROJECT: PIPELINES

Pipelines Map

The VEPH/NYSEG project incorporates two connected natural gas pipelines extending from southwest of Albany, NY, to (initially) Rutland, VT. The route of the Vermont section of these is shown on the map at left.

The Iroquois Gas portion of the proposed pipeline will connect to the current Iroquois transmission line at a location southeast of Canajoharie, NY. From there it will pass north of Schenectady, NY, through the Scotia-Glenville area, where it will supply the proposed VEPH 810 MW power plant, then continue eastward across the Hudson River to terminate in Bennington, VT. The length of this line will be about 70 miles, of which only the last 2 miles will be in Vermont.

The proposed NYSEG/SVNG pipeline will extend 63 miles from the Bennington, VT, termination of the Iroquois pipeline to Rutland, VT, along the route shown on the map. It will supply two VEPH power plants, the 270 MW plant proposed for Bennington (via a short spur pipeline) and the 1080 MW plant proposed for Rutland.

Each pipeline will be the first phase of long range, 10-year plans to introduce natural gas distribution systems into Western Vermont (NYSEG/SVNG) and into Western Massachusetts (Iroquois Gas). (See 09/30/98 Notes.)

The pipeline route shown at left is the preferred route, which is a composite of alternative routes proposed by NYSEG/SVNG. It was selected by an ad-hoc panel of NYSEG, VEPH, Vermont state agency, and federal agency representatives on the basis of Least Environmentally Damaging Practicable Alternative (LEDPA). (See Preferred Route Meeting Minutes.) The alternative routes proposed by NYSEG/SVNG followed, where feasible, either public rights-of-way or existing utility corridors, as is standard practice in locating pipelines. The Vermont Agency of Transportation (AOT) initially proposed that the pipeline utilize the existing Vermont Railway Corporation railbed, but NYSEG/SVNG argued in a reply to AOT that this was not a viable option.

Details of the various alternative routes, and their selection, are described on the pages dealing with how individual towns will be affected by the project. It is important to note that the preferred route is not necessarily the final pipeline route, as unforseen environmental and/or engineering problems will undoubtedly force adjusting this route, and might even mandate abandoning segments of the preferred route in favor of one of the alternatives.

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Copyright © 1999 by Vermonters for a Clean Environment
Updated: October 25, 1999